Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Free Essays on Auditing

The topic I will be discussing tonight is management’s assertions about the financial statements representing their company. According to the textbook these assertions can be divided into to five broad categories. These categories are existence or occurrence, completeness, rights and obligations, valuation or allocation, and presentation and disclosure. An auditor’s develops objectives, which vary from one engagement to another, depending on the entity’s business and the accounting practices distinctive to its industry. In the existence or occurrence assertion, management asserts that all recorded assets, liabilities, and equities disclosed in the financial statements actually existed at the balance sheet date. Management also asserts that all recorded transactions occurred during the period ending on the balance sheet date. The auditor’s objective is to test whether the assertions made by management are appropriate. For example, when auditing inventory an auditor’s objective is to determine if the inventory existed at the balance sheet date, if the recorded inventory purchases in fact occurred, and if sales transactions in the income statement represent the exchange of goods or services for cash or other consideration. This can be tested by observing the client’s physical count of inventory, confirming the off-premises inventory with public warehouses, and by using inventory cutoff tests to be sure purchases and sales are recorded in the correct accounting period. In the completeness assertion, management asserts that all transactions occurred during the period were recorded. This assertion is the most challenging for the auditor because he or she must discover any transactions that were not recorded but should have been and vise versa. For example, when auditing inventory the auditor will use the same tests used in the existence assertion. The auditor will observe physical inventory, confirm off-premises invento... Free Essays on Auditing Free Essays on Auditing The topic I will be discussing tonight is management’s assertions about the financial statements representing their company. According to the textbook these assertions can be divided into to five broad categories. These categories are existence or occurrence, completeness, rights and obligations, valuation or allocation, and presentation and disclosure. An auditor’s develops objectives, which vary from one engagement to another, depending on the entity’s business and the accounting practices distinctive to its industry. In the existence or occurrence assertion, management asserts that all recorded assets, liabilities, and equities disclosed in the financial statements actually existed at the balance sheet date. Management also asserts that all recorded transactions occurred during the period ending on the balance sheet date. The auditor’s objective is to test whether the assertions made by management are appropriate. For example, when auditing inventory an auditor’s objective is to determine if the inventory existed at the balance sheet date, if the recorded inventory purchases in fact occurred, and if sales transactions in the income statement represent the exchange of goods or services for cash or other consideration. This can be tested by observing the client’s physical count of inventory, confirming the off-premises inventory with public warehouses, and by using inventory cutoff tests to be sure purchases and sales are recorded in the correct accounting period. In the completeness assertion, management asserts that all transactions occurred during the period were recorded. This assertion is the most challenging for the auditor because he or she must discover any transactions that were not recorded but should have been and vise versa. For example, when auditing inventory the auditor will use the same tests used in the existence assertion. The auditor will observe physical inventory, confirm off-premises invento... Free Essays on Auditing In order to fully comprehend what is meant by internal control we must look at the definition as stated in the COSO report. It is defined as, â€Å"a process, effected by an entity’s board of directors, management and other personnel, designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the achievement of objectives in the following three categories: reliability of financial reporting; effectiveness and efficiency of operations; compliance with applicable laws and regulations.† An important aspect of internal control to keep in mind is it’s reliance on people. No matter how much control a company implements, there will always be humans involved at some step of the way and therefore a chance for error and/or fraud. It is important to remember that these controls can only provide reasonable assurance, not absolute assurance, regarding the achievements of a company’s objectives. Internal control consists of control activities. These activities include: performance reviews, segregation of duties, physical controls, and information processing controls. It is the responsibility of management to implement these activities effectively, and also to review the results so improvements or adjustments can be made. The auditor’s responsibility is to assess the level of risk connected to each control. After assessing the risks involved, tests must be performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the control in question. Some tests are more costly to run than the benefits that will be received. It is the job of the auditors to weigh the costs and benefits of performing each test and then determine which ones are to be carried out, and which will be scrapped. The controls discussed so far focus on management’s internal control over its employees. But in a retail store, employees are not the only ones with access to product, and therefore are not the only ones capable of influencing the financial statements. Management in the reta...

Monday, March 2, 2020

Mistakes Made by Native Spanish Speakers

Mistakes Made by Native Spanish Speakers Question: Do native Spanish speakers make as many grammatical mistakes in everyday Spanish as Americans do in everyday English? I am American and I make grammatical mistakes all the time unknowingly, but they still get the point across. Answer: Unless youre an incessant stickler for grammatical details, chances are you make dozens of errors each day in the way you use English. And if youre like many native speakers of English, you might not notice until youre told that a sentence such as each of them brought their pencils is enough to make some grammarians grit their teeth. Since language errors are so common in English, it shouldnt come as a surprise that Spanish speakers make their share of mistakes too when speaking their language. They generally arent the same mistakes youre likely to make when speaking Spanish as a second language, but they are probably every bit as common in Spanish as they are in English. Following is a list of some of the most common errors made by native speakers; some of them are so common they have names to refer to them. (Because there isnt unanimous agreement in all cases about what is proper, examples given are referred to as nonstandard Spanish rather than as wrong. Some linguists argue that theres no such thing as right or wrong when it comes to grammar, only differences in how various word usages are perceived.) Until you are so comfortable with the language that you have reached fluency and can use a style of speech appropriate for your situation, you are probably best off avoiding these usages - although they are accepted by many speakers, especially in informal contexts, they might be viewed as uneducated by some. Dequeà ­smo In some areas, the use of de que where que will do has become so common that it is on the verge of being considered a regional variant, but in other areas it is strongly looked down on as being the mark of an inadequate education. Nonstandard: Creo de que el presidente es mentiroso. Standard: Creo que el presidente es mentiroso. (I believe the president is a liar.) Loà ­smo and Laà ­smo Le is the correct pronoun to use as the indirect object meaning him or her. However, lo is sometimes used for the male indirect object, especially in parts of Latin America, and la for the female indirect object, especially in parts of Spain. Nonstandard: La escribà ­ una carta. No lo escribà ­. Standard: Le escribà ­ una carta a ella. No le escribà ­ a à ©l. (I wrote her a letter. I did not write to him.) Le for Les Where doing so doesnt create ambiguity, especially where the indirect object is explicitly stated, it is common to use le as a plural indirect object rather than les. Nonstandard: Voy a enseà ±arle a mis hijos como leer. Standard: Voy a enseà ±arles a mis hijos como leer. (I will teach my children how to read.) Quesuismo Cuyo is often the Spanish equivalent of the adjective whose, but it is used infrequently in speech. One popular alternative frowned on by grammarians is the use of que su. Nonstandard: Conocà ­ a una persona que su perro estaba muy enfermo. Standard: Conocà ­ a una persona cuyo perro estaba muy enfermo. (I met a person whose dog was very sick.) Plural Use of Existential Haber In the present tense, there is little confusion in the use of haber in a sentence such as hay una casa (there is one house) and hay tres casas (there are three houses). In other tenses, the rule is the same - the singular conjugated form of haber is used for both singular and plural subjects. In most of Latin America and the Catalan-speaking parts of Spain, however, plural forms are often heard and are sometimes considered a regional variant. Nonstandard: Habà ­an tres casas. Standard: Habà ­a tres casas. (There were three houses.) Misuse of the Gerund The Spanish gerund (the verb form ending in -ando or -endo, generally the equivalent of the English verb form ending in -ing) should, according to the grammarians, generally be used to refer to another verb, not to nouns as can be done in English. However, it appears to be increasingly common, especially in journalese, to use gerunds to anchor adjectival phrases. Nonstandard: No conozco al hombre viviendo con mi hija. Standard: No conozco al hombre que vive con mi hija. (I dont know the man living with my daughter.) Orthographic Errors Since Spanish is one of the most phonetic languages, its tempting to think that mistakes in spelling would be unusual. However, while the pronunciation of most words can almost always be deduced from the spelling (the main exceptions are words of foreign origin), the reverse isnt always true. Native speakers frequently mix up the identically pronounced b and the v, for example, and occasionally add a silent h where it doesnt belong. It also isnt unusual for native speakers to get confused on the use of orthographic accents (that is, they may confuse que and quà ©, which are pronounced identically).

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Domestic violence Case Study Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words

Domestic violence - Case Study Example Common assault has been made an "arrestable offence1", in the sense that the police can arrest a suspect at the scene of the assault without possessing a warrant. This is in variance to the previous practice where the police had to leave the suspected assailant with his victim. Common assault is now an alternative verdict in the Crown Court. There are a range of criminal offences, including sexual and physical assault, harassment and criminal damage, which can be used in cases of domestic violence. However, most offences2 do not take into account the cumulative pattern of violent behaviour, some of which may not constitute a criminal offence. There remains a significant problem with consistent implementation however and the judiciary still fails to treat crimes of domestic violence seriously3. The Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Bill received Royal Assent in November 2004 to become the Domestic Violence Crime and Victims Act 2004. Domestic violence occurs when a family member or a partner or ex-partner attempts to physically or psychologically dominate or harm the other. Domestic violence has many forms, including physical violence, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, intimidation, economic deprivation or threats of violence. Domestic violence includes physical violence, which consists of direct physical violence, ranging from unwanted physical contact to rape and murder; and indirect physical violence, including destruction of objects; throwing objects near the victim. It also, consists of mental or emotional violence; verbal violence, including threats, insults, put-downs, attacks, and nonverbal threats, including gestures, facial expressions, body postures, economic and social abuse, controlling victim's money and other economic resources. Moreover, it could also comprise of preventing the victim from seeing friends and relatives, actively sabotaging victim's social relationships and isolating victim from social contacts, spiritual abuse. Colleen is married to Wayne, a violent and abusive man. After the birth of their baby, Sven, Wayne put a lot of pressure on Colleen to lose weight, which she did. However, she became anorexic due to this. In this case, the husband Wayne is characterised as a violent in nature and abusive man. Subsequent, to the birth of Sven, Wayne pressurized Colleen to lose weight for which she had to follow the diet restrictions etc, and because of these, she became anorexic. A pattern of behaviour characterised by the misuse of power and control by one person over another who are or have been in an intimate relationship is termed as domestic violence. It can occur in mixed gender relationships and same gender relationships and has profound consequences for the lives of children, individuals, families and communities. It may be physical, sexual, emotional or psychological. The latter may include intimidation and harassment. Thus, the attitude of Wayne comes under controlling behaviour, which prevents someone by force from acting freely. This can include keeping them from seeing relatives and friends and so on. The Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 introduced

Sunday, February 2, 2020

Human Nervous System Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Human Nervous System - Essay Example The central nervous system (CNS) of the body is basically responsible for all the unintentional and reflex nerve action. It basically means that the central nervous system takes care of all the nerve action meaning that any type of nerve reaction is the sole responsibility of the CNS (Standley, 2013). The central nervous system (CNS) has the responsibility for almost all thing that a human being does. From the simple act of breathing to the complex mental abilities that help solve complicated mathematic problems are all the direct responsibility of the Central Nervous System (CNS) (Buzzle.com, 2013). Perhaps the simplest example of what the Central Nervous system does is in the fact that as soon as someone’s hand touches a hot object, the body reacts within milliseconds and the bodies reflex is to draw back the hand immediately. Behind this simple activity are sensory tasks performed by the Central Nervous System whereby the hot sensation registered by the hand is transmitted to the brain, is decoded by the brain and the brain instructs the specific part to perform the action of drawing back the hand. All this activity is undertaken in less than a whole second and the Central Nervous System (CNS) is responsible for it. The Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) (Dorland's Medical Dictionary, n.d.) is also known as the visceral nervous system or also the involuntary nervous system. Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) is a part of the body’s peripheral nervous system(PNS) and acts as a control system.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Beowulf as a Hero Essay -- Seamus Heaney

The poem, Beowulf, by Seamus Heaney, depicts Beowulf as a perfect hero. Beowulf is the mythical son of Edgetho and later becomes the king of the Geats. In the poem, Beowulf's shows heroism in two different phases of his life, youth and old age. Throughout the poem, Beowulf faces three difficult conflicts with Grendel, Grendel's mother, and the dragon. Throughout the novel Beowulf is a noted and respected warrior from Geatland. During Beowulf's youth, he is considered to be a great warrior, portrayed by his strength, courage, and bravery. Beowulf begins his legacy in Denmark with an evil monster, Grendel. Grendel is ruining King Hrothgar's kingdom and is ritually tormenting him. The monster breaks into the castle and eats as many of Hrothgar's men as he can hold each night. King Hrothgar calls Beowulf for help because the king has tried everything else. Beowulf arrives with a ship of his warriors to help King Hrothgar in stopping Grendel. King Hrothgar accepts Beowulf's pledge to kill Grendel. Beowulf pledges to face Grendel with, "no weapons, therefore, for either this night; unarmed he shall face me if face me he dares" (47). When Beowulf meets Grendel he fights barehanded and rips his arm off. Beowulf comes back with Grendel's arm. It is hung in the battle hall as a trophy of Beowulf's bravery, courage, and victory over the monster. Beowulf's defeat of Grendel certifies his reputation for bravery and es tablishes him as a full hero. Even though Grendel is dead, the danger has not passed. Grendel's mother comes to King Hrothgar's battle hall. She retrieves, "their trophy, Grendel's bloodied hand" (91). Hrothgar is very disappointed and calls on the hero, Beowulf, once again. Beowulf travels with his men to the fiery lake whe... ...he only one left of the WaegmundingsÂ…Now I must follow them" (189). Wiglaf is the only warrior who stayed to help Beowulf, the rest fled. Therefore, Beowulf leaves Wiglaf to rule his kingdom. Beowulf should be considered a hero because he gives his life to keep his kingdom safe. Beowulf is a great warrior, portrayed by his strength, courage, and bravery. Beowulf also exemplifies the manner and values dictated by the Germanic heroic code. He is considered to be both a warrior and a king. When Beowulf encounters the dragon, the responsibilities of being king are thrown. He must act for the good of his people, not just for his own glory. Throughout the poem, Beowulf holds a good reputation and is respected by the people. Works Cited Beowulf. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed M H Abrams, et al. Vol. 1. Sixth ed. NY: W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 1993.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Reign of Terror was during the French Revolution Essay

The immediate bloody aftermath , was a product of social, economic, and political forces. The spirit of idealism that gripped France during the early phases of the Revolution gave way to mass paranoia and extremism, culminating in Robespierre’s cruel regime. In the beginning of the French Revolution, Enlightenment of the French Revolution, known as the Reign of Terrorphilosophy seemed like a panacea for societal woes. Prominent philosophers like Rousseau, Voltaire, and Diderot contributed to a new mentality in France, one which instigated the mass revolt that caused the storming of the Bastille. The causes for the Reign of Terror in the 1790s cannot be isolated without examining first the leading causes of the French Revolution. Under the Reign of King Louis the XIV, France still maintained a basically feudalistic society in which the monarch ruled with divine and absolute authority. This â€Å"ancien regime† had persisted for centuries throughout Europe. A stratified social class structure dominated French culture and politics. The privileged classes, including the clergy and the nobility, were exempt from most of the taxes passed on to the poorest rungs of French society: the farmers, the common laborers, and the peasants. This system obviously benefited the wealthy, upper classes of French society, who were unwilling to sacrifice their economic and political privilege for a more just society. However, the monarchy and the â€Å"ancien regime† came under heavy criticism by Enlightenment thinkers, philosophers, and economists. Voltaire attacked the Church and its absolutism, criticizing the Church’s political and intellectual dominion. Denis Diderot advocated a new social order, while Montesquieu advocated the adaptation of an English-style constitution. Rousseau’s notion of popular sovereignty was perhaps the most influential political philosophies that influenced the beginnings of the French Revolution. Although the Revolution was spurned by these Enlightenment thinkers, the political philosophies they espoused failed to take root, leading to the Reign of Terror. The economic forces that led to the French Revolution also contributed greatly to the Reign of Terror in the 1790s. The Revolution started as a result of financial mismanagement on the part of the French government, who  was contributing to overseas efforts in the New World. Participation in the American Revolution caused national debt, and in an attempt to avoid national bankruptcy, the Assembly of Notables was formed in 1787 to attract donations from the wealthy classes. However, the privileged people were unwilling to offer financial support. King Louis the XVI and his government were forced to quickly adopt a plan of financial reform. The three class divisions in French society, the clergy, the nobility, and the commoners, held specific grievances toward the state. This generalized discontent and unrest led to the Revolution. The commoners, who were known collectively as the Third Estate, formed their own National Assembly amidst the political and economic turmoil in 1789. Some members of the other two estates, the clergy and the nobles, joined the efforts of the National Assembly, which called for a constitution. Their determination was solidified by the Oath of the Tennis Court, named after the meeting place they adopted after the King originally disbanded them. So influential was the National Assembly that the King relented to legalize the National Assembly, thus recognizing the grievances of the French common people. This small victory led to a mass outbreak of fervent idealism among not only the Third Estate of French culture but also among the clergy and the nobility, who were now willing to make the financi al sacrifices they needed to bond ideologically with the common people. The nobility abolished feudalism and linked hands with the commoners in their overthrow of the monarchy. The National Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of Man and in 1791 drafted a constitution that permitted a limited monarchy. The Church was hit hard by this early phase of the Revolution, as the National Assembly passed several measures opposing religious authority. Large numbers of nobles and princes, including the King himself, fled France in fear. The origins of the Reign of Terror can already be witnessed in this phase of the Revolution, in which a mob mentality took control of Paris and France in general. Although the political and social ideologies that underpinned the Revolution were admirable, the Revolution was fragmented and chaotic. Mobs, inspired by their victories, by their idealism, and their radicalism, turned revolutionary ideology on its back. In the early 1790s, several political clubs and groups formed in Paris to contend in the newly formed Legislative Assembly. Two of the more famous clubs, which would become influential during the Reign of Terror, were the Girondists and the Jacobins, who spread their ideology of â€Å"liberty, equality, and fraternity.† However, this spirit of liberty, equality, and fraternity would soon fall apart. First, the exiled nobility garnered international support for their cause and wanted to fight for their rights to regain control of France. Many revolutionaries and French Republicans also hoped that war would embolden the revolutionary cause and inspire other nations to their own popular revolutions. In 1792, the country engaged Austria in war, setting off a string of events that would eventually lead toward the Reign of Terror. Generally, an atmosphere of suspicion and paranoia fueled the Reign of Terror. The King, accused of treasonous actions against the Republic, became a focal point of anger. While it was understandable that the mass revolt against the old regime rested on the high ideals and aspirations of Enlightenment thinkers, the new regime that replaced King Louis XVI was no better. The National Convention scrapped their earlier constitution in favor of a new one in 1792, after the mass storming of the Tuileries. A massacre of thousands of prisoners, called the September Massacres, was an example of mob rule that gave rise to the Reign of Terror. The National Convention held a meeting in 1792, with the goal of completely abolishing the monarchy. As a result, King Louis the XVI was convicted of treason and executed. The execution of the King fueled royalist sentiments, which were supported by international support against the new Republic. France was still fighting Revolutionary wars abroad. The Republic became severely divided politically, as the Girondists and the Mountain party fought to gain power. The Girondists were basically centrists, while the Mountains were a far left leaning group who were affiliated with the Jacobins. The Mountains succeeded and summarily arrested and killed any persons who disagreed with their policies. The rise to power by the Jacobins in Paris marked the beginning of the Reign of Terror. Leaving aside the democratic ideals to which the original revolution ascribed, and which were summarized by the Declaration of the Rights of Man, the Jacobins instituted a militaristic dictatorship in Paris. Their aims were to destroy their opposition both at home and abroad. Abandoning their philosophical ideals, the Jacobins overtook all social and political institutions in the name of restoring order to their country. The Committee of Public Safety, the Committee of General Security, and the Revolutionary Tribunal were examples of the Jacobin organizations that were formed when they first rose to power. Still holding to the illusion that true democracy was possible, the Jacobin government believed that the Reign of Terror was necessary to first induce a sense of calm and order in France. Moreover, international opposition and war made the Reign of Terror seem like a wartime necessity. The terror tactics used were employed in the name of self-preservation. The Jacobins filled the j ails to capacity and ordered thousands of executions in order to assure the elimination of opposition forces. The leadership of Georges Danton and Maximilien Robespierre solidified the forces that enabled the government to practice its tyranny. Robespierre soon became the dominant force in the Reign of Terror and in 1794, Danton was executed because of his views espousing the abolition of the emergency measures that Robespierre was clinging to. Moreover, Robespierre ordered the execution of Jacques Hebert, whose glorification and deification of Reason became a popular movement. To counteract Hebert’s influence, Robespierre instituted the Cult of the Supreme Being, a perfect example of the fanaticism gripping the time. Interestingly, the government under Robespierre still proclaimed the economic equality of all citizens. Robespierre still believed that a just society in France was possible, but that the Reign of Terror was necessary in order to squelch any opposition. The government abolished slavery and enforced economic equality among the people by imposing wage and price caps and in troducing an artificially inflated paper currency called the assignats. Robespierre was clearly out of control and the National Convention finally arrested and executed him in 1794. The National Convention then drafted a new constitution and established the Directory. The Directory was designed to be a centrist political body that balanced the needs of the leftist  Jacobins and the right-wing royalists. Their initial economic reforms were beneficial in restoring the country after its being ravished by the revolution, but the Directory was wrought with internal and external political strife. Furthermore, international hatred for the Directory grew intense, which forced France to place Napoleon Bonaparte in power. Therefore, the Reign of Terror left a scar on French politics that would lead to the Napoleonic years. The original revolutionary ideals of reason, liberty, equality, and fraternity were now covered in blood. Basically, the Reign of Terror is an example of failed implementation of lofty democratic ideals. The Enlightenment idealism that sparked off the French Revolution was completely transformed into fear and paranoia. The Reign of Terror has some elements of a massive revenge campaign against the oppressive regime of the monarchy. However, the popular revolt that led to the righteous overthrow of the monarchy and feudalism had no clear focus. The ideals of democracy and equality were thwarted by the chaos and fear that gripped the nation once the monarchy was overthrown. The Reign of Terror was in part a response to post-revolutionary chaos, and was a concerted effort to restore social, political, and economic order. However, the Jacobins resorted to means as cruel, if not crueler, than those used by the monarchs they hated. Far from promoting liberty and justice, the Jacobins executed people without regard to their class and without permitting any victim to defend themselves. Instead of implementing a democracy, based on the true and original Jacobin ideals of â€Å"liberty, equality, and fraternity,† the Jacobins stripped French citizens from each of these rights. The Reign of Terror was a panic campaign, an example of what happens when a small group of men take control over a nation in a time of crisis. Ironically, Robespierre spoke out against tyranny and oppression and ascribed to Rousseau’s political philosophy. Robespierre held fast to the abstract vision of democracy, popular and self-rule, and political virtue. However, he resorted to means that were antithetical to his original vision of the Revolution.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Merchant of Venice Essay The Role of Jessica - 500 Words

The Role of Jessica in Merchant of Venicenbsp;nbsp; nbsp; The character of Jessica, in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice serves an important function in respect to her father, Shylock. By deserting him for a Christian husband, Shylock loses the last person with whom he has any kind of tie. Shylock’s isolation becomes a vital part of his character, and drives his merciless actions against Antonio. Throughout the play, everyone who could claim any type of social or familial tie to Shylock leaves him. Launcelot the Clown, moves to a Christian master, who has the,grace of God... (II,ii L.139) His own daughter Jessica forsakes him, and his entire Jewish culture, to marry Lorenzo, and become a Christian. Thus Shylock has no one from†¦show more content†¦He can no longer think of people as separate from money. His bond with Antonio is thrown to such extremes because Antonio does not exist as a person in Shylock’s eyes. Instead, Antonio becomes a symbol for the kind of family Shylock yearns for. This desire comes out by Shylock’s words in the courtroom scene. After his defeat, Shylock tells the group that no matter the judgement, he is still ruined. He says: Nay, take my life and all! Pardon not that! You take my house when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house. You take my life When you do take the means whereby I live. (IV,i L.372-5) By removing from him his wealth, the court sentences Shylock to virtual nothingness. Shylock’s words here are loaded with emotion because he has been reduced to nothing. His selfish ways drive him from his entire house, and now those same feelings cause his money to also disappear. Shylock’s reply to the sentence in the passage above shows his isolation from the world of Christian motives. Money is truly Shylock’s only relative at the end of the play. Jessica’s disappearance becomes doubly-damaging with her theft of the gemstones, and the three thousand ducats. By taking money, Jessica not only removes herself from her father, but also steals the object through which Shylock has attached himself to. Shylock yearns for something to hold on to. HisShow MoreRelated Is The Merchant of Venice an Anti-Semitic Play? Essay1491 Words   |  6 PagesIs The Merchant of Venice an Anti-Semitic Play?      Ã‚   The Merchant of Venice features a Jewish character that is abused and slandered by nearly every character in the play. Throughout the play the behavior of these characters seems justified. In this way, The Merchant of Venice appears to be an anti-Semitic play. However, The Merchant of Venice contains several key instances, which can be portrayed in a way that criticizes anti-Semitism. 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Whether it is his intention or not, Shakespeare chooses to create the imageRead MoreThe Role of Prejudice in the Merchant of Venice2395 Words   |  10 PagesThe Role of Prejudice In The Merchant of Venice This paper discusses the subject of prejudice in the William Shakespeare play, The Merchant of Venice. I. Introduction William Shakespeares satirical comedy, The Merchant of Venice, believed to have been written in 1596 was an examination of hatred and greed.The premise deals with the antagonistic relationship between Shylock, a Jewish money-lender and Antonio, the Christian merchant, who is as generous as Shylock is greedy, particularly